The Liminalist # 264: Faith for Eternity (with Samuel Corwin)

Return conversation with Samuel Corwin on Post-Covid Society and Making a Break from Hell & Back to Nature

Part One: Undercover Among the Id-Entities (0 – 37 mins)

Jasun’s special mission to Galicia, post-covid social reality, feeling contempt for humanity, managing hysteria, Michigan militia & lockdown, Samuel’s insomnia, the path of uncertainty, Slovakian quarantine facilities, IMF bribing Belarus to lockdown, disaster capitalism, global scale, traveling through Europe, National Guard in the US, fear of the virus, traumatized hypochondriacs, catching the common cold, no sense of a health risk, the fear of death, the imposition of a protective bubble, a world of eggshells, hospital workers, when the face becomes a private part, only the officials don’t wear masks, a psychological pacifier, going undercover among the id-entities, masks as dehumanizing, divisive tactics, tackling schismogenesis, a tragic loss of humanity.

Part Two: A Post-Disaster World (37 mins – 1 hr 7 mins)

Expected apocalypse, exiting society, collective complicity, They Live scenario, an apocalyptic perspective, the vaccine, banning fossil-fuel vehicles, getting enlightened in time for the end times, saying goodbye to the normal, enter UBI, leaving behind the support system of technocracy, government grants for eco-tourism, a pre-industrial community, renouncing convenience, essential work, a Slovakian mill, goats and cheese, rural tourism, when the seed is planted, an apocalyptic pairing, a post-disaster world, community caretaking, deactivating live land mines, tied up with immigration, trapped in the US.

Part Three: When Fantasy Becomes Reality (1 hr 7 mins – 1 hr 47 mins)

Election singularity, 2016 election, when the melting pot comes to the boil, accelerating social change, burning bridges to family, when fantasy becomes reality, killing chickens, the life of a peasant, leaving the map, 16 Maps of Hell, Scorpio & Taurus, the need for Nature, desert island people, the right stuff, considering compatibility, becoming fully human, non-social interaction, milking goats, learning to kill, making cheese & bread, living off-grid, a monkish existence, solitary community life, trip to India, intuition and desire, sensing the currents, a thirty-year plan, a state of not-knowing, never let a crisis go to waste, gut vs. reason, paranoia or excitement, building another arc, pulling up roots, a gravitational pull, the void of increasing disbelief, intensely liminal, walking the liminal talk, going on faith.

Part Four: Out of the Mind & Into the Body (1 hr 47 mins – end)

The context, Morocco, making the leap, worth failing, fire-gazing, mapping Hell, out of the mind & into the body, letting go of the future, addiction to progress, time in cycles, the highway to hell, all noise, the Christian rerun of eschaton, the mark of beast, I love my phone, Dante’s inferno, north and south, the maze of Hell, the labyrinth of control, the assurance of technocracy, getting lost with GPS, starve the algorithms, using the tech to connect, meeting in not-Zion, quarantining the technology, TK’s manifesto, alcoholic’s hungry void, imagining a natural future, trusting in nature, false & real stimuli, what verifies the present, a lifelong romance with culture, writing about Oshana retreats, the free-form podcast, blurring separation, a rare type of community, when ego falls away, the social impetus.

Article on IMF bribes to European countries to push covid-19 lock-down measures.

Podcast Art: Martin Jolly

Songs: “The Power of AW” & “Chasing Time” by Joy Zipper; “The Same Deep Water As You” by People of Nothing; “Lullaby” by Blackout Transmission.

16 thoughts on “The Liminalist # 264: Faith for Eternity (with Samuel Corwin)”

  1. Interesting Convo!

    Covid is 98% diagnosis (not sickness) byway of bad testing. The Government is the True threat.
    I work the front line.

    Cheers!

    Reply
  2. One of the things I love about the podcast is the intimacy of your talks. I always feel like I’m in the room and a part of the conversation. This particular episode took it to the next level. Vinny and I have said verbatim many of the things you guys said so I really felt like I was there, finishing sentences etc. Vinny is also a bandana guy haha. It’s comforting knowing we’re not the only ones that feel this way and at the same time the validation is frightening. Things seem pretty normal where we live, maybe there’s something to living in a red state (I never thought I’d say that). You have to wear a mask in stores and walking to a table in a restaurant but not outside and most people don’t. All of our friends and acquaintances aren’t scared, we don’t social distance or wear masks around each other. We chose a Waldorf homeschool group for our son so he’s not feeling the wrath too much. Honestly he’s the main reason I’m so stressed out about this. This has brought the idea of “I wouldn’t want to bring a child into this world” to a whole new level.
    Thank you for playing our music on the show. Just yesterday I got a really strong feeling that the best defense right now may be to focus on art. Use it to keep away the noise. You adding our songs to the show was a little gift confirming that.

    Reply
    • thanks Tabitha; there’s a hum of loving reciprocity in the air currently which your response adds its nectar to… sort of invisible jamming; feel free to share any new songs here; & thanks for having the courage to bring new life into a dying world

      Reply
  3. Surprisingly soothing to listen to both of you this morning. Thank you.
    Thoughts…..The linchpin holding this worldwide pandemic together is the belief that viruses exist and that they are contagious. Neither is true. The Contagion Myth, Dr. Thomas Cowan. et als.
    You Jasun know I don’t wear a mask and, I have several reasons for making that choice, while I have that option. Lately my time is taken up deleting my research from social media. FB f—checkers have already performed about 20% of that for me. Oooo-ah.
    However, being an optimist helps. The pushes and pulls of the world unnerve me somewhat, but it’s not overwhelming. Perhaps I’m an anomaly because I have no fear.
    Thanks again. Feeling connected now. “Anomaly”

    Reply
  4. A gold miner in Death Valley in early 1969 before the atrocities advised Charles Manson that to leave the city for the country was to exchange one set of problems for another. Charle didn’t heed the advice. I studied in college about Christian intentional communities during the 1970s, and that history is not pretty. The average lifespan of an intentional community was five years, usually ending disastrously. The only way it works if for there being an alpha person or couple that owns at least 51% of the commune, otherwise, true to human condition, there will be an alpha upstart trying to hijack a successful community… and then there are the freeloaders and fugitives that would certainly collapse a community. I traveled to a Christian commune in 1980 in Northern California to observe it’s dynamic. After 7 years in was in angry decline due to the clashes of personalities and contentions. There was very little Christian left about it. In highschool, my family moved from Hollywood to rural Oregon, I milked goats twice a day, it was fun for a week, but then the reality of working a farm becomes apparent, there is no free time during the Summer, someone has to constantly maintain the animals… it’s not glamorous, raking animal s**t all day. If you don’t have a financial stake in an intentional community: it is a little better than slavery. I have just finished the advanced pdf of 16 Maps of Hell. It is a very harrowing ride. It matches my experience in Hollywood during the 60s and 70s. My father was a boom operator for many movies, tv shows and commercials. The reason why my father left Hollywood at the peak of his career was because he came to the conclusion it was an Evil place and it was eating his soul away, he may have felt threatened. He had the most horrible things to say about the players, several are the ones mentioned in your book. I too have deep trauma from those years and had to put the book down at times as both my parents had connection to people mentioned in your book… but that was a long time ago and now they have nothing to say about it as they did thirty years ago. I find great comfort in Buddhist meditation these days to burn away that trauma. I still have a horrible need to often go back and dwell in the thrall of that dark place, because it’s where I was born and I know how to surf that dark energy. Thanks for your writings.

    Reply
    • compelling first-hand testimony; did the book provide any relief?

      interesting how you segue from the (a) proposed exit (as being itself a bit hellish) all the way (back) into hell

      maybe the problem with intentional communities is that they are intentional? (the road to hell?)

      our plan is to keep intentionality out of it as much as possible. that seems to be our only hope as humans.

      Reply
    • interesting, thanks…

      From the site:

      It’s hard to say who ‘we’ are really, as there are so many people who make this place what it is. Our founders, Toby and Francesca, moved here in 2010 with a vision to create a place of refuge. From small beginnings they built up much of the structure and community that we find here today. They and their family then moved to Parma in Italy in July 2017. Since then Chris and Katharine and their boys Josh and Natty have been the family in residence. More recently the warden team has been expanded by the arrival of Ian.

      We believe in a God who is love and so all are welcome. …

      There are usually three or four guests living here at any one time. Some come just for a long weekend and some stay for several months.

      They run something called a forest school there

      Reply
  5. Thanks, I actually gave the wrong link (to their second location); the original place was the Pilsdon community. I thought seriously of volunteering there for a while. Life and work, and an inglorious reluctance to change, intervened.

    They were radically inclusive at Pilsdon, requiring only that no resident should take drugs, including alcohol. Hand-work (gardening, carpentry, etc.) was part of daily life there, but no one was forced to take part. Same with their informal daily Christian services.

    I’ve thought of them often while reading your tales of daily life in the thrift shop and listening to your inspiringly unconceited conversations in the podcasts.

    Reply
  6. About half way through the podcast. You almost always exceed my expectation with your balanced and thoughtful opinions concerning our current environment. Always expect you to be much more radical in your conspiracy views, but much better balance of skepticism and acceptance of what life is bringing to our experiences. I feel like the community in which you are hoping to build and live is something I would fit into very well, but all the conditioning that the “empire” has placed in my mind, such as the failure of all such endeavors in the past, the stigma of being a nutter that ran off and joined a commune, and all the “responsibilities” to my family, especially my children, financially as well as being the role model in how to succeed in this messed up system, would keep me from trying such a life style. I have followed Guy McPherson over the last decade and he tried something very similar, but gave it up as hopeless and not worth the effort, so there is that cautionary tale that would say to one, ” It is not worth the effort”. Would definitely be interested in staying for a while, maybe to explain to my small world, that is is just a break, or rest for a bit. Story of my life, always going in two opposite directions at the same time, and not progressing in any direction, just going in circles. Well that is my feelings, uncovered and raw.

    Reply
  7. In regards to mask wearing-
    When Mr Corwin was speaking to his feeling toward others stepping aside while out walking being polite, as well as not being able to meet their eyes I recalled felling similar. I also felt contempt and anger. In the end tho it all turned into an overwhelming sense of pity not only for them but the entire human race.

    Reply
  8. Good news ! After months of delay, the Danish surgical mask study results have finally been published:

    https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-6817

    The quick summary is that Danish researchers and doctors conducted a study of almost 5,000 Danes in May and June to understand the practical benefit of wearing surgical masks to prevent cars-cov2 infection. The results:

    Diligent wearers of surgical masks became infected with sars-cov2 at a rate of 1.8%.

    The control group that did not wear masks became infected with sars-cov2 at a rate of 2.1%.

    In other words, wearing surgical masks (let alone the lower quality cloth ones) makes almost zero difference in catching the virus.

    The “science” has spoken and it is time to repeal the useless mask mandates. Finally, some news to smile about 🙂

    Reply
    • except your smile, if visible, will be considered an infraction of the law 🙂

      the notion that facts might alter the course of global engineering is touchingly optimistic

      Reply

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