There Must Be Some Way Out of Here (Let’s Talk About Societal Exit Strategies)

On a scale of 1 to 10, just how bad is the social system you depend on? If you are reading this blog, then you probably agree that it’s at an 11.

And on a scale of 1 to 10, how much are you doing to extricate yourself from it? My guess is, nowhere near the same degree.

So what’s it going to take before we start taking our situation as seriously as it needs to be taken, and start making the appropriate steps? I am starting to wonder if anyone has what it takes.

OK, then, if you aren’t (yet) trying to extricate yourselves from a soul-sapping, life-negating socio-political system of oppression and exploitation­—are you at least dreaming of ways of doing so? How can we withdraw both our consent and our compliance (= complicity) with evil, and explore alternate options for establishing a solid and lasting foundation of stability, solvency, and comfort within our lives?

In my own life, I have traveled an unusually broad spectrum, from the effortless luxury of my trust-fund teenage years and early twenties, to voluntary poverty, homelessness, and vagrancy in my mid-twenties (including sojourns in a Monastery and fruit-picking), to hand-to-mouth working stiff existence in my late-twenties, to becoming a self-made man with a constant source of income in my forties and fifties (first via online guidance and then by running a small town thrift store). Now, finally, I am taking the slow, precarious steps (as the world closes down around us) to something like self-sufficiency as a (soon-to-be) land-owner ready (or at least willing) to relearn the basic human skills of working with the land and animal-keeping.

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Recently, through online interactions with a number of honest, open, and vulnerable men and women, I have seen people caught in jobs and life situations that are stifling their spirit, crippling their bodies, and depleting their most precious commodity: time. I have started to wonder, just how many noble souls are squandering their life force on apparently necessary pursuits that are slowly but surely depleting all sense of meaning, purpose, and goodness in their lives, and further dissociating them from truth and reality?

Unplugging from the soul-draining, mind-crushing, body-rejecting human farming system of society in 2021 is about as difficult as getting an Amazon staff member to help you access your account once you’ve been shut out—cubed. Everything is set against us because the system gives less of a damn about us than MacDonald’s does about cows. It is only interested in our blood.

Having our nervous systems wired up to a Smart superstructure, having our life force used as a human battery and our neurology coopted as an organic computer circuit board—is this really the life you dreamed for yourself and your children? So why are we so meekly acquiescent? Is it because we think the only alternative is eating snot on the Nebuchadnezzar, or rooting for bugs on our hands and knees like the fallen king it was named after?

If so, relax: I am not proposing dropping out of the system entirely, building a shelter out of fallen trees (not yet anyway). Rather, a middle way between mountain man and corporate battery/host to AI. In my experience, the first and most essential step is to rediscover our trust in life and in existence, to reconnect to Nature, as the original support system that predates society and culture by billions of years­­—really, for eternity.

The birds and the bees know how to do it (have naturally, genetically ordained functions complementary with their environment and conducive to their own well-being and abundance); so why not we? The answer is that we do, if we can only rediscover it. It has existed for probably thousands of years, and it could exist again for us if we are only willing to take the necessary steps and make the required (apparent) sacrifices to facilitate an awakening of our ancestral, instinctive sense of purpose, function, goodness, and meaning.

In my own current process of social extrication and natural reconnection, which I am still in the thick of, a number of possibilities are becoming visible and tangible to me, and they are available to anyone who dares to make a clean break from a life of indentured corporate slavery, and explore more creative, improvised, and natural forms of living. This does not entail a full-on, all-out return to Nature, but is somewhere between the two ends of the spectrum, such as buying a super-cheap house in a depopulated area and doing your own renovations, then setting up a local used goods store, all of which could be done in one or two years, for around $50,000.

I mention this as an example only, to emphasize that the purpose of an online meeting around this subject is not only to thought-experiment our way out of our matricular pods, but to explore practical, real-world possibilities, and  come up with actual, easily testable solutions, for those who may have started to believe that there really is no solution.

If you are interested in participating in this online exploration via a new Affinity Group space, comment below or contact me.

23 thoughts on “There Must Be Some Way Out of Here (Let’s Talk About Societal Exit Strategies)”

  1. Among a myriad of competing problems/issues etc, extricating ourselves from the current and the coming system has to be a priority for anyone who wants to live anything resembling a sane life.

    I thought that I had already done it by moving to Belgrade. However, the tentacles are spreading and city life will never be the same. I’m ready to be feral in all honesty, but it’s not all about me. Hence, the endless weighing up of options, procrastination and inaction. One would hope that the good things happen at the right time and that the opportunity to be created hasn’t been missed.

    Other than relaxing our nervous system, the most important decision is ‘the move’ and the subsequent lifestyle. I can’t think of a more pressing question.

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    • Cities anywhere are to be avoided. I hear you with regard to the constant weighing up of options and inaction. Decisions are harder to make when kids, etc have to be factored in.

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    • My late friend used to say, “Most people are better off where they are with what they’ve got.”

      I think it’s worthwhile to think about what this might mean.

      About 30 years ago I was crossing the ice on the 8th of 9 portages when I bottomed-out too hard crossing back onto land. I put a hole in my pan and a lot of the oil spilled out onto the ice.
      It was dark, about -15 and we were a good 20 – 25 km from ‘home’.

      One option would have been to stay put and build a fire, but we opted to walk. My companion and I were in our early 30’s, and relatively fit. The air was still and the night bright and clear, illuminated as it was by a waxing crescent moon.

      -15 isn’t that cold if you are walking briskly and the wind is not blowing.

      As it turned out, after walking only a couple of kilometres, another vehicle stopped and offered us a ride which we cheerfully accepted.

      We could have ‘stayed where we had been with what we had’ and the scenario would’ve played out the same.

      What I learned from the whole thing was this: it pays to be as fit as you can manage, as lean as you can get, as prepared as you can reasonably be, because this increases your repertoire of options.

      The best choices are made from a position of strength not weakness.

      I’m on assignment again today, so I’ll have to pick this up later, if there’s interest.

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  2. I’ve been thinking about Bulgaria……..Cheap land and property, a disorganised, corrupt and (pretty) laissez faire government and depopulated.

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    • It’s my daughter’s opportunities that concern me. I’ve been ready to move to the countryside for a while. Arguments in favour of a community (not a commune) have fallen on deaf ears.

      I’m right next door in Serbia. Bulgaria is a beautiful country. Used to be an agrarian economy but has been plundered thoroughly during the 90s (industry included) and has made no progress in any respect since joining the EU. It’s a vassal state of Brussels.

      The upside is that you can buy property and land for a favourable price. From what I hear, there are communities of foreigners who have settled and love it there. Definitely a country worth considering moving to.

      Serbia is pretty much the same, just not in th EU.

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        • Not 100% sure to be honest. Plenty of foreigners from across the EU and US and everyone has managed to sort their papers out. Some bought property long before sorting out immigration visas.

          I could ask around if you’re interested.

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  3. Is it possible to utilize the material/non-material fruits of the ahrimanic and luciferic intelligences at the same time as undermining those intelligences’ agendas?

    Logical the answer is no but something tells me that logic doesn’t have a monopoly on what is going on here…
    When we interact with The Machine (society) it strikes me that sometimes it is a very fine line between feeding the life-force of the Machine (and its agendas) and turning the Machine’s life-force against itself (undermining itself)…

    (Certainly pumping money into the Machine oils its cogs — so small gestures like supporting local, independent, small businesses when financially viable to do so is obviously one small thing everyone can do…)

    …I appreciate the invitation to talk real-world practical tactics…

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    • >Is it possible to utilize the material/non-material fruits of the ahrimanic and luciferic intelligences at the same time as undermining those intelligences’ agendas?

      I sure hope so, otherwise my biography may well end up being called The Irredeemable Hypocrite.

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  4. Jasun, would this be a one-time affinity group, or a weekly? Either way, I would like to participate, if/when I am available.

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    • it will be according to demand; happy for it to be weekly, in which case may have to be a Monday or a Friday, or an earlier time than usual

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  5. I would be interested in an ag around this topic. My only issue is setting aside another morning to be in front of the screen. As it gets hotter here morning becomes the only time of day that it’s bearable to be outside and active. Hopefully the timing will work for me to attend. It is helpful just to read this blog and all the comments. There is great value in being reminded that I am part of a community (albeit virtual) of like minded and like souled beings. Best to you all

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  6. Much thanks to all of you. I read your comments and mull them over for a spark of lightness in an otherwise dark and somewhat foreboding world.
    Possibilities are enticing.
    JF

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  7. I have always wanted to open the olde curiosity shoppe in some rustic location. Failing that, a well designed “sustainable” laundromat/gathering place in a rustic location. One that would be like the streambeds of yore when women and children played and did laundry by beating cloth upon rocks.

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  8. Before you move somewhere.
    First ask yourself if you are a top down Principled Deductivist, a bottom up Inferential Constructivist, or have you mastered the gentle art of Abductivist ?
    Then look for a place that might have some clue where you are coming from.
    In any case its hard to move now fhat the shootin’ and hollerin’ has begun.

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    • lol; conjures the image of someone walking into a swamp while wondering if he wore the right necktie for the awards ceremony.

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  9. Rational mental modes as necktie !
    I love that
    Villains and mentally ill people in popular culture these days are often portrayed as deductive, principled thinkers, but in an ironic twist these people are the most likely to link to apriori orders of Angels ?

    Principles are just so unfashionable right now. Seen as too narrow and constricting, rather than constructing.

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  10. Since there us some interest in ag, 12 years avocado/ coffee in the central corrillera Colombia …consider ; plant extracts, cold pressed or streem distillation .
    This guys opinion; If i had to do it over again for the big cash crops I’d bypass them all, simply for the reason I believed these markets rigged in favor of buyers.

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